The Atlantic Blue Tang (Acanthurus coeruleus)

Atlantic Blue Tang

The Atlantic Blue Tang (Acanthurus coeruleus), is also known as the Blue Caribbean Tang, Blue Tang Surgeonfish. Acanthurus coeruleus or Atlantic Blue Tang is a marine tropical fish belonging to the family Acanthuridae, that includes the tangs, surgeonfish, and the unicornfish. Adults differ in shades from powder blue to a vibrant royal blue. These color variations are often incorporated into their names, as an example, the powder blue tang.

The Atlantic Blue Tang is a flat-bodied oval-shaped fish. Adult and juvenile color palettes are totally different from each other. Adults are powder blue or deep blue with a yellow caudal spine. The color slowly grows darker as the fish continues to age. Adults also have horizontal lines on their bodies whereas juvenile has no body markings.

The Juveniles Atlantic Blue Tang come in brilliant yellow with blue trimming on the edges of their dorsal fin and anal fin and lose their coloration around 3 to 5 inches (7.6 to 13 cm) to depending on the individual fish. This species of tang after that undergoes an intermediate phase when it is powder blue with a yellow tail. The caudal fin is usually the last part of the juvenile body to go through the color change. The blue color will darken into deep blue or purplish-gray. 

The Atlantic Blue Tang is discovered in the Eastern and Western Atlantic. In the Western Atlantic, it might be encountered from New York in the USA to Brazil, including Bermuda as well as the Gulf of Mexico. In the Eastern Atlantic, it has actually been observed in the waters of Ascension Island. The largest scientifically measured Atlantic Blue Tang was 39 cm (15.4 inches).

The Atlantic Blue Tang inhabits coral reefs and inshore rocky or grassy areas at depths of 2 to 40 meters / 6 to 131 feet. This species of tangs often hide in cracks and crevices at night to avoid predation, that is why the juveniles are mostly found to be hidden and come out not often in the wild.

The Atlantic Blue Tang lives one at a time, in pairs, or in small groups consisting of up to a dozen specimens, although sometimes it forms large aggregations that forage about the shallow reefs, grazing on algae. These aggregations don’t have to consist of Atlantic Blue Tang only, sometimes include doctorfish (Acanthurus chirurgus) and other surgeonfish.

The Atlantic Blue Tang is usually active during the daytime and stays hidden throughout the night. It is known to set up cleaning stations where it has been observed removing parasites as well as molted skin from other species.

 

How To Take Care Of Atlantic Blue Tang?

How To Take Care Of Atlantic Blue Tang

Do you know how to take care of Atlantic Blue Tang? The aquarium should be at least 100 gallons or larger tank is necessary to provide plenty of swimming room because of their size. It is not recommended to house this species in a tank smaller than 50 gallons / 190 liters.

Decorate the fish tank with plenty of live rocks and hiding spots, which allows it to carry out it is natural scraping and sorting behavior. In the aquarium, they are very aggressive towards its own species especially to other Acanthurus species but peaceful with other fish in the aquarium. They could be successfully integrated into a community environment without any troubles. It is for that reason advised that you only keep a single adult in an aquarium.

Water quality should be kept to consistently high standards, as like some other members of this family, will make sure these fish stay healthy and disease-free. The water must be warm, keep the water temperature around 77°F – 82°F (25°C – 28°C), the pH-value at 8.1 – 8.4, and the specific gravity at 1.020 to 1.025 should be maintained. Powerful water movement is highly recommended. It is very important to keep the oxygen level up.

Powerful water movement is highly recommended. Like all Tangs, the Atlantic Blue Tang requires highly oxygenated water. It is essential to keep the oxygen level up. You can attain this using multiple powerheads. Check out the aquarium temperature level though and remove a powerhead if the water temperature level gets too high. They will also appreciate high water flow throughout the aquarium.

Saltwater Fish Disease – Diagnose, Symptoms and Treatment. Ich (white spot – cryptocaryon) and marine velvet are very common with this Atlantic Blue Tang. Quarantine is highly recommended for this Tang! Use cleaner shrimps as well. Keep the water highly oxygenated.

 

What Does An Atlantic Blue Tang Eat?

What Does An Atlantic Blue Tang Eat

The Atlantic Blue Tang is herbivores and needs to be supplied with a diet of plant-based and marine algae marine fish food so as for them to survive and continue to be healthy in captivity. They will eat thawed frozen foods for marine fish and you’ll be able to supplement their diet with seaweed (sushi nori). They will also eat meaty marine foods, however, most of their diet should be plant-based. Meaty foods should be offered a few times per week to help provide extra protein.

In the wild, the Atlantic Blue Tang feeds mainly on algae which it grazes from rocks and corals. Unlike lots of other species of surgeonfish, the Atlantic Blue Tang could not handle ingested sand or other calcareous materials very well.

Natural algae growth must be encouraged in the aquarium and it is prudent to feed your Atlantic Blue Tang lots of small servings of food throughout the day instead of just 1 or 2 large meals. Naturally occurring algae is seldom enough and it is for that reason a good idea to supplement with dried algae, fresh algae, and algae-based foods, e.g. spirulina flakes. They are typically reef safe when they are maintained well fed with the algae and other foods.

 

The Breeding Of Atlantic Blue Tang

The Breeding Of Atlantic Blue Tang

The Atlantic Blue Tang will become sexually mature when it is 9 months to 1-year-old and 11 to 13 cm (4 to 5 inches) long. In the wild, spawning occurs throughout the late afternoon or in the evening. Before spawning, this species will change color instead of its common dark blue coloration it will be light blue on the anterior part of the body and dark blue posteriorly.

Males Atlantic Blue Tang aggressively court female participants of the school, resulting in a quick upward spawning rush toward the surface of the water throughout which eggs and sperm are released. Spawning rushes usually take place in low light conditions, typically at or near dusk.

The eggs are pelagic, each containing a single droplet of oil for flotation. They float with the tides after being fertilized. The fertilized eggs hatch out within 24 hours as silver / brown slivers, revealing small, translucent larvae with silvery abdomens and rudimentary caudal spines. They alter their tang appearance after concerning a week. In the wild,  jacks, tuna, and groupers will feed on Atlantic Blue Tang.

http://www.animaldiscoveryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/The-Atlantic-Blue-Tang.jpghttp://www.animaldiscoveryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/The-Atlantic-Blue-Tang-150x150.jpgorebtoonAtlantic Blue TangUnderwater AnimalsAtlantic Blue Tang,How To Take Care Of Atlantic Blue Tang?,The Breeding Of Atlantic Blue Tang,What Does An Atlantic Blue Tang Eat?The Atlantic Blue Tang (Acanthurus coeruleus) The Atlantic Blue Tang (Acanthurus coeruleus), is also known as the Blue Caribbean Tang, Blue Tang Surgeonfish. Acanthurus coeruleus or Atlantic Blue Tang is a marine tropical fish belonging to the family Acanthuridae, that includes the tangs, surgeonfish, and the unicornfish. Adults differ in...It's all about things you do not know about monkey, eagles, guinea pig, puppies and many more.