The Blue Poison Dart Frog (Dendrobates tinctorius “azureus”)

blue poison dart frog

The Blue Poison Dart Frog (Dendrobates tinctorius “azureus”) also known as the blue poison arrow frog is a member of the family Dendrobatidae. This frog is a species of poison dart frog discovered in the forests bordered by the Sipaliwini savanna, which is located in southern Suriname and alongside far northern Brazil.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog is a mid-sized frog with bright blue coloring. Its back and top of the head are lighter-colored sky blue, while its belly, as well as legs, are a darker blue color. Dark blue and black spots cover the frog’s body, mostly its back and head. It is occasionally considered to be a morph of the dyeing poison dart frog, however, it has a small skeletal and also genetic difference that leads some to retain the belief that it is a different species.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog displays aposematic coloration. Just as in the case with other poison dart frogs, bright coloration acts as a warning to potential predators that it is toxic. In fact, its skin is covered with glands of poisonous alkaloids located a protection mechanism to potential predators. These poisons paralyze and also occasionally kill the predator.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog, like all members of the genus Dendrobates, produces pumiliotoxin, which affect contraction in the heart and also muscles, most likely through voltage-gated calcium channels, causing both hyperactivity as well as paralysis. These poison frogs are not the most deadly of the Dendrobatidae, however, touching one will make a person extremely uncomfortable.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog is diurnal and mainly terrestrial. This poison frog is a mid-sized, growing to approximately 35-45 mm (1.4-1.8 in) in standard length and typically females are slightly larger and plumper than the males, with her average body length slightly over 2 inches. They are carnivore that might live for about 4-6 years in the wild, and about 10 years in captivity.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog prefers a dark, damp environment. They are active during the day and can be discovered hiding among rocks as well as debris near streams and among leaf litter on the forest floor, however, they lack toe webbing and also are poor swimmers, so they are not discovered in the water. It typically remains on the ground, however, has been discovered in trees at heights of up to 15 feet.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog inhabits small isolated forest areas surrounded by the dry, prairie-like Sipaliwini Savanna at altitudes between 1,000 and 1,400 feet (305-426 m). However, the forest habitat of Blue Poison Dart Frog is fairly humid and warm with temperatures varying from 22 °C (72 °F) to 27 °C (81 °F) during the day to 20 °C (68 °F)  at night.

 

Diet Of The Blue Poison Dart Frog

Diet Of The Blue Poison Dart Frog

The Blue Poison Dart Frog are carnivorous animals that survive on a diet purely made up of meat. They shoot out their long adhesive tongue to catch insects. Due to the toxin levels produced by the poison frog, it has very few predators in the wild.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog feed during the day mainly on insects they encounter on the rainforest floor, including caterpillars, ants, beetles, flies, mites and also millipedes. They will also consume spiders and other arthropods. However, many kinds of insects and other small invertebrates can be eaten.

Surprisingly, the toxic compounds in the skin of Blue Poison Dart Frog, called lipophilic alkaloids, are found in high levels within its prey, especially in formicine ants. These toxins do not harm the frogs themselves. Instead, the frogs excrete the toxins through their skin to prevent predators from eating them. And this species loses its toxic properties due to the lack of toxic compounds in its diet.

In captivity, the Blue Poison Dart Frog is fed with Drosophila fruit flies, termites, aphids, pinhead crickets, the larvae of various insects, and other tiny, live invertebrate foods. For adult frogs, dust fruit flies with a vitamin and mineral supplement once weekly. Dust the insects every other feeding for young, growing frogs. Additionally, this species loses its toxic properties due to the lack of toxic compounds in its diet.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog food requirements vary with age and activity levels, monitoring the number of flies in their terrarium is essential. No more than a few flies should be left from the previous feeding before you add more to the enclosure.

 

Reproduction Of The Blue Poison Dart Frog

Reproduction Of The Blue Poison Dart Frog

In their reproduction behavior, the Blue Poison Dart Frog is similar to other poison dart frogs. Breeding occurs throughout the rainy season. Eggs are laid in moist areas, however, are not completely submerged in the water.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog breeds seasonally, typically during February or March. The male sits on a rock or a leaf and produces silent calls, which the female follow to track down the male. When found, female fight aggressively over the male. The male takes the female to a quiet location by the water, which becomes the site of the egg-laying.

The Blue Poison Dart Frog reach sexual maturity at about 2 years of age. The female lays 5-10 eggs at each mating. Eggs are laid in the territory of the male as well as he aggressively protects them. The male takes care of the eggs, occasionally joined by the female. After about 14-18 days, the eggs hatch and emerge as tadpoles.

The male will carry the hatchlings individually, or in tadpole packs on his back, to the closest water source. An in-terrarium pond is great for this purpose. Occasionally the female also helps in this transportation of the tadpoles. It takes tadpoles 10-12 weeks to go through metamorphosis and become adult frogs.

 

How to Aquarium Care for Blue Poison Dart Frog?

How to Aquarium Care for Blue Poison Dart Frog

The Blue Poison Dart Frog a species of mid-sized poison dart frog. A pair of adults could be kept in a 20-gallon long terrarium, however, larger is always better. These species are diurnal (active during the day). They can be kept singly, in pairs or in groups. When the animals reach sexual maturity, at around a year of age, they are best kept in a pair, If an enclosure large enough is provided, then the group should happily cohabit with each other.

The temperature should be in the low to mid-20s (°C) 70s (°F). They should be checked daily as the species is sensitive to high heat and must be kept away from direct sunlight. The humidity of the enclosure should be above 80% all of the time. This can be achieved by being sprayed up to 4 times a day for at least 20 secs a spray.

Additionally, naturalistic vivarium is the typical approach to keeping poison frogs. The naturalistic vivarium is an aquarium that has been designed to produce a small ecosystem. In this ecosystem, there are plants, soil, and also a drainage layer to maintain the soil from becoming completely saturated.

The naturalistic vivarium creates a balance where the animals waste is used by the plants. This balance produces an environment where the maintenance, includes adding food for the frogs as well as cutting plants out as they grow. No removal of waste and or tank cleaning is necessary.

http://www.animaldiscoveryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/blue-Poison-dart-frog.jpghttp://www.animaldiscoveryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/blue-Poison-dart-frog-150x150.jpgorebtoonBlue Poison Dart FrogUnderwater AnimalsBlue Poison Dart Frog,Diet Of The Blue Poison Dart Frog,How to Aquarium Care for Blue Poison Dart Frog,Reproduction Of The Blue Poison Dart FrogThe Blue Poison Dart Frog (Dendrobates tinctorius 'azureus') The Blue Poison Dart Frog (Dendrobates tinctorius 'azureus') also known as the blue poison arrow frog is a member of the family Dendrobatidae. This frog is a species of poison dart frog discovered in the forests bordered by the Sipaliwini savanna, which...It's all about things you do not know about monkey, eagles, guinea pig, puppies and many more.