The Blue Ribbon Eel (Rhinomuraena Quaesita)

blue ribbon eel

The Blue Ribbon Eel (Rhinomuraena quaesita), also known as the bernis eel or leaf-nosed moray eel, is a species of moray eel, the only member of the genus Rhinomuraena. They are also called Black Ribbon Eel and Yellow Ribbon Eel. Unlike the more common snowflake eel, the Blue Ribbon Eel is much slimmer and has a very distinguishing face.

The Blue Ribbon Eel is discovered in lagoons as well as reefs in the Indo-Pacific ocean, ranging from East Africa to southern Japan, Australia and also French Polynesia. Although typically placed in the moray eel family Muraenidae, it has several distinguishing features leading some to place it in its own family, Rhinomuraenidae.

The Blue Ribbon Eel is an animal bearing a similarity to a mythical Chinese dragon with a long, thin body as well as high dorsal fins. The ribbon eels easily are identified by its expanded anterior nostrils. They are fairly unique and are bright blue and yellow, it resembles a ribbon, hence the name.

The Blue Ribbon Eel are typically chilling out in their caves. They sit there as well as wait for food to swim past and use the caves to hide from predators or in this case, humans. When someone tries to catch the eel-like by hand or with a net they dart into the caves and are nearly impossible to safely remove.

The Blue Ribbon Eel is born hermaphrodites and goes through the color change as it becomes male. Depending on the stage of the ribbon eel’s life it may appear black, blue and or yellow, although this has yet to be confirmed. Colour change related to sex change is unknown from any other moray eel species.

All ribbon eels begin as male and are black with a yellow dorsal fin. As they mature, the male eels turn mostly bright blue with yellow accents around the mouth and on the dorsal fin. The changes do not stop there. After the male body reaches a specific length, it starts to turn yellow and will develop female parts until it is able to lay eggs.

The Blue Ribbon Eel grow up mature to 40 inches (3.3 feet) in length, which is not very large in eel terms. They are carnivore that might live up to 20 years in the wild. Sadly, they have been observed in many cases to stop eating after being captured and also rarely survive longer than one month in captivity.

The Blue Ribbon Eel is one of the more difficult to care for eels. They have thin bodies and could escape from almost any tank, that is why we suggest it only for expert aquarists. They should be kept in a tight-fitting lid or light diffuser panel.

 

Diet Of The Blue Ribbon Eel

Diet Of The Blue Ribbon Eel

The Blue Ribbon Eel are primarily carnivorous, which means that they feed just on meat. They are a very finicky eater and also require pristine water. In nature, Blue Ribbon Eel feeds on small fishes. They also will prefer crustaceans with calamari, mussels, shrimp, clam, fish and also frozen silversides being good food choices as well.

Remember Blue Ribbon Eel consume their meals whole, bones and all. Try to incorporate whole foods into your eels diet while keeping it as varied as possible. However, be careful while feeding the Blue Ribbon Eel as its eyesight is not that good and it might end up in biting your hand. That is why we suggest you use feeding tongs instead of using fingers. Twice-weekly feedings are recommended.

In addition, most of hobbyists and pet stores that have got these fish used as a feeder, the rosy red minnows or guppies. Those are freshwater fish and could cause long-term issues for any marine fish that eats them. A good choice is to breed saltwater acclimated mollies as well as use them as food. They are much healthier since their body chemistry actually adjusts to that of an actual ocean fish.  

 

How to Aquarium Care and Setup for Blue Ribbon Eel?

How to Aquarium Care and Setup for Blue Ribbon Eel

The Blue Ribbon Eel require a large tank. Since they could grow up to 40 inches (3.3 feet) long. Minimum tank size is 60 gallons or more gallons and they consume a lot, so having supreme filtration is required along with regular water changes.

The Blue Ribbon Eel is known to jump out of the aquarium and can be challenged to keep. To keep this escape artist from slithering out of a tank, its top should be tightly sealed. They may bother sessile invertebrates and also other corals, that is why it is considered reef safe, however, with caution.

The aquascaping should consist of few inches of sand topped with rubble, to allow burrowing, as well as live rock arranged in a honeycomb fashion to provide enough hiding place that the eel could choose from. Artificial cave-like structures, such as PVC pipe, can be provided for a haven as well.

The Blue Ribbon Eel should be kept in water at a temperature between 72 °F (22 °C) and 78 °F (25 °C). The pH level should be between 8.2 and 8.4, as well as dKH between 8 and 12, are recommended. The water quality should be perfect. No ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, and ensure healthy eels.

 

Tankmates Of The Blue Ribbon Eel

Tankmates Of The Blue Ribbon Eel

The Blue Ribbon Eel is best kept by itself in a tank dedicated to its needs. They do not mess with fish often, however, have been known to bite as well as swallow smaller ones when hungry or fighting for food.

In addition, if any other fish are kept in the same aquarium, avoid species that are aggressive, boisterously active, prone to nipping or stinging, or small enough to be swallowed, so they should be excluded as tankmates as well. Providing no threat to sessile invertebrates, Blue Ribbon Eel are typically considered reef-safe.

http://www.animaldiscoveryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/blue-ribbon-eel-1.jpghttp://www.animaldiscoveryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/blue-ribbon-eel-1-150x150.jpgorebtoonBlue Ribbon EelUnderwater AnimalsBlue Ribbon Eel,Diet Of The Blue Ribbon Eel,How to Aquarium Care and Setup for Blue Ribbon Eel,Tankmates Of The Blue Ribbon EelThe Blue Ribbon Eel (Rhinomuraena Quaesita) The Blue Ribbon Eel (Rhinomuraena quaesita), also known as the bernis eel or leaf-nosed moray eel, is a species of moray eel, the only member of the genus Rhinomuraena. They are also called Black Ribbon Eel and Yellow Ribbon Eel. Unlike the more common...It's all about things you do not know about monkey, eagles, guinea pig, puppies and many more.