The Red Cherry Shrimp (Neocaridina denticulata sinensis)

Red Cherry Shrimp

The Red Cherry Shrimp truly stands out in the aquarium especially against plants as well as darker substrates. The natural coloration of the shrimp is green-brown, however, the red morph is more often sold. The density of coloration on adult shrimp, dependent on breeding, determines their sale price and also quality (grading). This quality is purely aesthetic, as the size, behavior, as well as other characteristics of the animal, is more or less equal across varieties.

The Red Cherry Shrimp are very hardy as well as condition tolerant compared to other varieties of shrimp. This makes them an excellent beginner shrimp. They are easy to breed, maintain and they will naturally hide from predators.

The Red Cherry Shrimp is a non-aggressive shrimp. They are active throughout the day, and also can be seen grazing on biofilm, aquarium decoration or the sides of the tank, hunting detritus among the gravel, as well as occasionally even mating.

The Female pregnant Red Cherry Shrimp tend to hide in the dark. If they feel threatened by predators, they will abandon their eggs. They require an environment with wood or plants such as Java moss in where to hide themselves as well as their babies. When they are carrying the eggs under their bodies, they can be observed circulating water over the eggs with their pleopods (swimming legs) to ensure healthiness.

The male Red Cherry Shrimp is smaller as well as less colorful compared to the female. The male’s tail, not being needed to carry eggs, is narrower. The female shrimp is larger as well as shows a richer coloration. On the upper part of the female’s body, on the shoulder, the developing eggs on the ovaries might be seen in more clear individuals.

The color of these eggs will depend on the variety of individual shrimp. The shape of the ovaries drapes across both sides of the shrimp, giving rise to the nickname saddle. The presence of a saddle shows a female that is likely ready to mate.

The Red Cherry Shrimp will typically reach about 4 centimeters (1.6 in) long. They prefer clean water, with a pH of 6.5-7.8, and a temperature of 21-26 °C (70-80 °F), is recommended. These shrimp are omnivores that might live for about 1-2 years.

In their natural environment, Red Cherry Shrimp are mostly prey animals. When choosing tankmates for your shrimp, a little common sense is in order. While these shrimp are peaceful and would never harm your fish, there is no guarantee that the fish will not harm them. As a result of the small size of these shrimp, choose carefully any fish you place in the same tank. Small tetras, rasboras, and also other non-aggressive small fish should be fine.

 

Diet Of The Red Cherry Shrimp

Diet Of The Red Cherry Shrimp

The Red Cherry Shrimp are omnivorous. Basically, they will eat almost anything. In a well-planted tank, they will almost always have something to eat. These shrimp are mainly biofilm as well as algae eaters. They will eat any food intended for aquarium use, however, some will prefer compressed algae discs (algae wafers).

The Red Cherry Shrimp will readily accept most types of fish food, whether it be a flake, frozen, or pellet. A well-balanced diet of fresh vegetables and processed foods are recommended for Red Cherry Shrimp. Blanched (boiled until soft) vegetables such as baby carrots, zucchini (courgette) and also spinach can be used as a supplemental food, however, should be fed sparingly. Make sure to remove any uneaten food so they do not rot as well as adversely affect your water quality.

The best way to keep a healthy balance in a tank with Red Cherry Shrimp is to allow them to consume all the microorganisms that grow in a tank consisting of on the glass, on plants, and all over driftwood, this way the tank works in balance along with the advantageous bacteria that grow in an active and also oxygenated filter.

The Red Cherry Shrimp is directly related to the environment, stress level, sexual maturity, and also diet. By providing a well-balanced as well as the varied diet you will help to ensure your shrimp show their best.

 

Reproduction Of The Red Cherry Shrimp

Reproduction Of The Red Cherry Shrimp

The Red Cherry Shrimp are among the easiest of freshwater shrimp species to breed in the aquarium. By gradually moving the water temperature a little higher to around 81-82 °F (27 °C) it simulates summer environments to shrimp and naturally prompts the beginning of breeding.

The Red Cherry Shrimp are very easy to breed. They reach sexual maturity between 2 and 3 months of age. Breeding just requires a sexed pair of shrimp, stable water parameters, as well as a food source.

The female Red Cherry Shrimp will begin to turn very red and you will see eggs being held in their shrimplets. The female shrimp will release hormones into the water and the males will discover her as well as a mate. The female shrimp could store sperm like guppies and mollies. The female shrimp will keep the eggs and then after a while, they will release the baby shrimp. The shrimp are miniature reproductions of the adults. You do not need to worry about the parents eating their young. For ideal breeding results keep shrimp without other fish.

The female Red Cherry Shrimp have 20-30 eggs, which take 2-3 weeks to hatch. The eggs are yellow or green, depending on the color of the saddle. They turn darker and darker until the young shrimp hatch after about 3 weeks. As the eggs near the end stages of growth, small dark eye spots of the developing shrimplets within can be observed.

They have no planktonic larval stage and spend their first couple of days of life hiding among plants or rocks, where they are practically invisible, nibbling on the biofilm on the plants. After that emerge and graze on algae on tank surfaces and also ornaments. In addition, the female Red Cherry Shrimp, under ideal conditions, could breed again within a few days of hatching the previous clutch.

 

How to Aquarium Care and Setup for Red Cherry Shrimp?

How to Aquarium Care and Setup for The Red Cherry Shrimp

The Red Cherry Shrimp is very hardy and adapts to a wide range of water conditions.They do not require a large tank. As a result of these shrimp small size and also relatively low bioload, they could typically be kept in smaller confines. Larger tanks are needed to keep multiples alive as well as happy for the longer term though.

A standard 10-gallon tank or one of the very popular nano tanks will work well, although larger is always better in order to maintain a more stable environment. The Red Cherry Shrimp make an excellent addition to a planted tank, in fact, they seem to thrive in such an environment. While eating almost every kind of algae in the tank, they will do no damage to your live plants.

As far as filtration goes, practically any kind of filter will work. However, keep in mind their little size. Baby shrimp, as well as small adults for that matter, can easily be sucked into the intake of a power or canister filter. I would suggest placing a piece of fine mesh, sponge, or even an old pantyhose over the intake to protect your shrimp.

The water should be well-filtered, medium hardness, and slightly acidic, and maintained at a temperature of 21-26°C (70-80°F), as well as a pH level between 6.5 and 7.8, are recommended. Do not put with bigger or aggressive fish to your shrimp they will eat them.

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